Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms

Advanced Phonics logo Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms

by Pyxwise Software Inc

(Release date 7th December 2012 – Special intro. price of $0.99 – before rising to $4.99USD)

Receiving a copy of Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms was very exciting for me. As an educator, I recognise that it is important for an app to have the right content and features so that it can be incorporated into my planning and teaching to optimise student learning. Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms exceeded my expectations.  As soon as I opened the app, I was immediately in awe of the design and educational thought that has gone into this product.

Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms is a complete package and has the following features:

  • A full years worth of lessons to compliment your curriculum.
  • 52 lists containing over 750 high frequency words. These are organised by spelling patterns and difficulty levels.
  • Each list has a lesson to guide the user and help cement spelling knowledge, including syllables, sounds, spelling rules, and some of the more advanced English phonograms.
  • An introductory lesson and help menu with clear instructions, audio narration and feedback.
  • The ability to have multiple users.
  • Settings which can be customised to suit American, Canadian, or English spelling.
  • The ability to customise the keyboard layout, select upper or lower case letters, and more.

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The ability to read and write is fundamental to successful learning at school. Literacy skills influence a person’s chances of finding and retaining employment, achieving financial independence, and having a positive self-esteem. When learning to read and write, children benefit from provision of systematic structure, and direct guidance or scaffolding. Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms does this very nicely. The program can be customised for each of your users. This includes the ability to change the number of correct attempts at a word before the score reporting recognises that the student has mastered the lesson and all of the words within it.

Click the images below to enlarge and view them in slideshow mode. They show the introductory lesson.

I really like how the app scaffolds students for successful learning. At any stage during the lesson, your students can get help by pressing the buttons on the screen. This includes:

  • an explanation – for the sound that the student is currently working on;
  • a play button – to hear the word separately and in a sentence;
  • a syllable button – to  hear and see the word broken into its syllables; and
  • a hints button – to get extra help for spelling the word.

Depending on the lesson, other buttons might be displayed. Explanations of all of the buttons can be found by tapping the top-left arrow and then tapping the “?”. The images below show how a student can work through the spelling of a word. I like how the student is provided with positive reinforcement at the completion of each word, regardless of the number of hints that they required or errors that they made when completing the task.

Pyxwise Software recommend that Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms should be used for students that are at least nine years of age. I agree with this statement; however, if you have younger students that are at a higher level, you should definitely use it with them. Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms is designed to extend the knowledge that your students have already acquired by working through the complete lessons on other apps in the Pyxwise series. They are Simplex Spelling Phonics 1 – English; and Simplex Spelling Phonics 2 Syllables – Spell To Read.

What do I like about Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms?

I can write all day about Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms. I love it that much!

  • It is a great app that is crafted beautifully.
  • It could be used in the classroom by a teacher as part of a literacy block with all students or as a specialised instruction tool to help specific students gain mastery in spelling, contractions, syllables (including multisyllables) and more.
  • It could also be used by a speech language pathologist in a therapy session or at home under parental guidance.
  • Every word is broken down into its syllables both visually and auditorily to help students build phonological awareness skills.
  • Pyxwise Software promote deep understanding by using a “reverse phonics” hint feature to break each word down further into individual phonemes to improve phonemic awareness, a critical skill for literacy development.
  • The ability to have multiple users is highly valued by educators (and therapists), and essential for classroom use.

What would I like to see in future updates?

I don’t have very much to add here. The only thing I would like to see relates to reporting of student results and progress. At the moment, I would have to go into the app and view each user profile and then check the statistics for each lesson to see how my students have performed. It would be fantastic if there was an option to upload (for individuals and in batch format) to a CSV or Dropbox format or have the ability to import the information when syncing the device to iTunes. Note: I understand that Pyxwise are working on this feature to include in future updates (fantastic!).

Final Thoughts…

Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms is one of my favourite spelling and phonics apps. It is great to see an app that focuses on spelling for students in the upper primary years that still need this type of instruction and scaffolding. The concepts are taught and reinforced to enable students to gain mastery levels. As I investigated the app, I thought to myself “Finally, an app that can actually be used in the classroom!“. I recommend Simplex Spelling Phonics – Advanced Phonograms to educators, speech language pathologists, and parents.

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HELP – I Have a Guided Access Problem

In a previous post about Guided Access, which is new in iOS6, I outlined how the feature can keep easily distracted users on task. However, if you are a regular user of Guided Access, you may encounter a situation where you are locked in the feature. I am aware of two types of problems that can lock you in Guided Access.

1 My device has a bug or freezes

You will be locked in Guided Access if it is active when the device freezes. This can also occur when the password pin pad does not pop-up when using triple click home to exit from the app/program.

2 The password to disable Guided Access cannot be entered

The administrator of the iDevice is not available or cannot recall the password to exit Guided Access.

The problems mentioned in the first point are the result of a bug(s) associated with iOS6. I understand that these problems are still occurring very rarely despite a recent iOS update. This only seems to occur with third-party apps.

How do I exit Guided Access when I encounter a problem?

There are two solutions to this problem which will allow you to disable Guided Access:

  1. The first method is to force a reboot of your iDevice, and
  2. The second method is to use the Find My iPhone app or iCloud website.

Both of these processes are outlined below.

How do I perform a forced reboot and exit Guided Access?

To perform a forced reboot and to fix the problem with Guided Access follow the steps below:

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  1. Hold both the Home and Power buttons for 10 seconds until the apple logo appears on the screen. The apple logo indicates that a forced reboot has commenced.
  2. Immediately after the device has rebooted, the home screen will briefly display before returning to the application that is in Guided Access. While the Home screen is displayed (or just as the app/program is opening – but before Guided Access has been re-enabled), press the Home Button once. This will  keep the display on the home screen.
  3. Settings icon To disable Guided Access click the Settings icon. From the left-hand sidebar select General. From the right-hand sidebar select Accessibility. The right-hand sidebar will open a range of Accessibility options, select Guided Access. The Guided Access screen will be displayed. Move the Guided Access Slider to the OFF position. The iDevice should now have Guided Access disabled.

Note: Occasionally this process does not disable Guided Access. When this occurs Guided Access must be turned on at the slider and a new password set before repeating the reboot and disable process. The iDevice should now have Guided Access disabled.

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2 How Do I Use Find My iPhone and exit Guided Access?

  1. Start the Find My iPhone app on another iDevice (or if you don’t have one – go to iCloud.com, where you must login with your Apple ID and password, and select the Find My iPhone/iPad tab).
  2. Select the name of the iDevice that is locked or frozen in the Guided Access feature from a list of devices and select the Lost Mode button.
  3. When prompted set up a new password for Lost Mode. Then select the Next and Done buttons on the next 2 pages after that to exit (see images below).
  4. The iDevice that is locked in Guided Access will then lock and enter Lost Mode.
  5. Go back to the original iDevice to continue disabling Guided Access. To unlock the iDevice enter the password that you just set in Find My iPhone. Your device will appear normal and display one of the app icon pages.
  6. Next start the process to disable Guided Access by clicking on the Settings icon. From the left-hand sidebar select General. From the right-hand sidebar select Accessibility. The right-hand sidebar will open a range of Accessibility options, select Guided Access. The Guided Access screen will be displayed. Move the Guided Access Slider to the OFF position. Your iDevice should now have Guided Access disabled.

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Guided Access in the Classroom

Guided Access for iDevices was a topic of great interest for educators at a recent Professional Development that I presented at a local university. It is also the solution to ongoing enquiries from educators and members of the iTeach: Apps for the Classroom community about how to disable certain functions on their devices when they are under the control of their learners. In this post I will briefly explain some of the basic Guided Access features available to iDevices with the latest iOS6 update.  There are two main enquiry types that have been made, so I will outline how Guided Access may be used for each.

 What is Guided Access?

Guided Access keeps the iPad/iPod Touch/iPhone in a single app, and allows you to control which features are available or disabled to prevent students from performing specific actions that are not in alignment with the tasks that are set. Running it disables the home button and, depending on the selected settings, may also be used to disable touch or motion.

Problem 1 – My learner keeps exiting the educational app that I want them to use and then plays a game app!

Solution : This action can be prevented by running Guided Access. The only way to exit the application will involve pressing the home button three times and, when prompted, entering a secret four letter password that you have pre-set. The learner will be unable to enter a correct password and cannot exit the application without it. To find out how to set up Guided Access, see below.

Problem 2 – When using a designated app or video the learner alters settings in a way that is not suitable or appropriate to the educator or parent. This may include situations where the learner accesses in-app settings on an educational app to change or alter content (preventing effective learning). It also includes students continually stopping and starting an application or changing the volume levels up and down excessively.

Solution:  Under the Guided Access feature, these actions can be prevented by disabling a section of the screen that contains the button that controls these functions. To find out how to set your device to include this feature see below. 

How do I set up Guided Access?

Settings icon

To set up Guided Access click the Settings icon from the Home screen.

From the left-hand sidebar select General. From the right-hand sidebar select Accessibility. The right-hand sidebar will open a range of Accessibility options, select Guided Access. The Guided Access screen will be displayed. Move the Guided Access Slider to the ON position and select Set Passcode. Enter a password that you will use to control Guided Access as an administrator, re-enter your password and exit out of settings.

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Enter the app that you want to run Guided Access in. I have used a movie from my videos section for the demonstration. After the program (or app) opens, triple click the home button (if prompted select Guided Access). Select the START button from the top-right corner. You will be notified with a pop-up that Guided Access has started. Your learner may now use the app without being able to exit it and play other applications. To exit guided access just triple click the home button and enter your password.

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How do I disable part of the screen with Guided Access?

Enter the app that you want to run Guided Access in. I have used a movie from my videos section for this demonstration as well. After the program (or app) opens, triple click the home button (if prompted select Guided Access). You can draw with your finger a freehand shape around the area you want to disable. In the images below, I selected the on-screen play and volume slider area. If I wanted the whole of the selected area to be inaccessible, I would not need to do any more and I would just press the START button at the top-right corner.

However, I might want to allow my user to have access to the play/pause button but not the volume button. After I have drawn my shape around the button, I can now drag it to increase or decrease the area I want inaccessible. I decreased the height of mine to disable the volume. I can then press the START button in the top-right corner. The disabled section is shaded when you run the program or app.

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To exit the app or stop using Guided Acces, triple click home and when prompted, enter your password code. You will need to remove the selected areas if you want to remove this feature from the app/program.

A Word of Warning

Guided Access is widely considered to be the solution to access issues on iDevices with students. While it is a great feature, it is important to note that this feature might not be appropriate if you want to use an app with multiple screens and areas. Under Guided Access, that whole section when anywhere in the app or program will be disabled (even if there are no buttons or areas on subsequent levels or pages). While you won’t have to change and alter Guided Access for every movie you watch (because it is the one program), you will need to set it up for each app that you want to use Guided Access with.

Overall, I like the capablilities of the Guided Access feature for classroom use. Many students that have special needs quite often are very savvy with iDevices and it is hard to keep them from touching and changing settings that you would rather them not have access to. This feature solves the problem.

The next post in this series shows you how to overcome issues with Guided Access – HELP – I have a Guided Access Problem

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TenseBuilder

 TenseBuilder

by Mobile Education Store ($20.99AUD)

I was really excited when I first saw TenseBuilder. I knew right away that this app could make a difference for our learners who have learning difficulties, special needs, or just simply do not understand the concepts behind time and tense. I think that the most exciting features of this app are the mini animations which help set-up the context for the sentence and learning. Like all Mobile Education Store apps, this app begins with the settings screen. This is the heart of the TenseBuilder app, where nine different adjustments can be made so that it aligns to your learner needs, including:

  • The audio instruction, correct answer reinforcement and record correct answer features can be turned on or off;
  • The level of play, and number of level choices (between 3-7);
  • The tense you would like to focus on (past, present, future, or all);
  • The types of verbs (regular, irregular, or all);
  • Individual verbs can be selected;
  • Long or short lesson; and
  • It is also where you can find a comprehensive Video Tutorial about how to use and customise the app.

I really like the fact that this app has two levels. Level 1 aims to improve receptive language skills. It features short animations and then the user is presented with a tense sentence and three image choices. The user is required to tap the correct image which corresponds with the tense sentence at the top of the screen. I have set the app to have long lessons, future tense, and level 1. The following will happen, depending on the user’s choice.

  • If they answer correctly (and you have audio and correct answer reinforcement turned on), the user will be praised, the sentence will be spoken, and the user will have the option to record and save the sentence for review by an educator or parent at a later stage.
  • If they answer incorrectly, the app brings up a pop-up animation showing the correct tense in action. The user is then guided back to the selection screen to choose again.
  • If the user is unsure they are able to click the Play Full Lesson button. This will bring up the short animations of each of the tenses. The app uses audio and visual cues to show each tense and how it looks in written form. I think this feature is wonderful!

Level 2 aims to improve expressive language skills. The user is shown a short animation. A partially completed sentence will appear in the sentence strip and the user will be asked to complete the missing part of the sentence so that it aligns with the stated tense (selected via the settings menu). A selection of between 3-7 answers will be displayed at the bottom of the screen. The user drags their chosen verb to the top sentence and the app reads out the sentence. The following will happen, depending on the user’s choice:

  • If they chose the correct verb tense the user will be praised, and they will be given the choice to record and save the sentence for review by an educator or parent at a later stage. They can then move on to another verb animation and lesson.
  • If they choose the incorrect verb tense, the app brings up a pop-up animation showing the correct tense and word structure for the sentence. The user is then guided back to the selection screen to choose again.
  • As in Level 1, if the user is unsure they are able to click the Play Full Lesson button. This will bring up the short animations of each of the tenses. The app uses audio and visual cues to show each tense and how it looks in written form. Did I mention previously that I think this feature is wonderful?

What do I like about TenseBuilder?

I like how you are able to skip verbs lessons and go to the next one without having to complete each and every lesson in a particular order. This is really important because it could help keep learners engaged and on-task. In addition, particular verb(s) can be selected to work on from the settings menu.

I like how particular attention is paid to irregular verbs, which are hard for many students, with or without special needs, to comprehend. The visuals support these concepts nicely. The app features 48 video lessons, which is ideal if you want to work on 1 verb each week.

I really love that TenseBuilder incorporates animations to help set the scene and show how past, present and future tense actually works for each verb. They say that a picture tells a thousand words, if that’s the case then this app must tell a million!

As an educator, I like that you can be emailed results and track a user’s progress; however, you need to ensure your device has an enabled email account attached to it for this feature to work.

What could be included in future updates?

I think that the ability to switch between accents would be a great compliment to TenseBuilder. Although it wouldn’t be realistic to expect every accent to be included, incorporating a male/female option and up to five different language accents would be great.

As a classroom educator knowing that I would need to use TenseBuilder with anywhere up to 28 different users, I think that having the capacity to input multiple user profiles which can be stored, tracked and accessed by selecting a user from a list would be ideal for assessment and reporting purposes.

Conclusion

Overall, I really like the animations. They are what makes TenseBuilder stand above other apps on the same topic. Both expressive and receptive language skills are important for everyday communication. TenseBuilder helps to improve, maintain and generalise these skills so that the user is effectively scaffolded for conversations using the correct verb tense and form. As an added bonus, the humour within the animations can be explored in detail with learners who have Autism and other special needs.

TenseBuilder is one of the best apps I have come across in the language arts area. Educators, Speech Language Pathologists, Occupational Therapists, and parents should consider downloading this app to help their children/learners understand how to use tense and verb form properly.

To look at TenseBuilder in action, please view the slideshow below:

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